INGELOW, George Kilgour

1821 - 1865

Baptised at St Botolph’s church, Boston, Lincolnshire on 14 August 1821, son of William Ingelow, banker, and his wife Jean, daughter of George Kilgour, his elder sister was the author Jean Ingelow (1820-1897). On his father’s first bankruptcy at Wisbech, Lincolnshire in 1825, the family moved to Ipswich where his father opened a branch of the Suffolk Banking Company in Elm Street and in 1836 purchased the banking house in Elm Street for £2,300 but the bank failed in 1845 and merged into the East of England Bank, now part of NatWest Bank. Educated at Ipswich grammar school where Ingelow was an intimate school friend of the future Punch artist Charles Keene [q.v.], and then took a position at Oakes Bank at Bury St Edmund’s, Suffolk. Ingelow and Keene moved to London and shared lodgings in Great Ormond Street for two years but on his father’s second bankruptcy in 1845, George moved to Calcutta, India where he remained for about ten years, during which time he kept up a regular correspondence with Keene, who managed to get some of George’s Indian drawings reproduced in the 'Illustrated London News'. He married at Calcutta on 1 September 1849, Catherine, daughter of Francis Henchman and their daughter Kate, was born at Clive Street, Calcutta the following year. He then moved to Singapore where he remained for about a year before finally moving to Sydney, Australia, where his daughter Edith was born in 1857, taking the position as a bank clerk at the Oriental Bank. He remained in Australia until his death at O'Connell Street, Sydney, New South Wales on 10 August 1865, his daughter Kate was the executor to his will. During his time in Australia he continued with his painting and etching and in April 1855 is listed as a member of the Sydney Sketching Club and in 1862 exhibited his work at the London International Exhibition. Ingelow's poet sister Jean dedicated her 'Poems' (London 1867), written in 1863, 'to George K. Ingelow. Your loving sister offers you these poems, partly as an expression of her affection, partly for the pleasure of connecting her efforts with your name.’ he had in fact died some two year prior to their publication. (Copsey - Suffolk Writers 1800-1900)




Works by This Painter